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Spring Constant Calculator

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Spring constant is the amount of force required to move the spring a set amount of distance. The set amount of distance is determined by your units of measurement and your spring type. For example if you are calculating the spring constant of a compression spring using English measurements your value would be pounds of force per inch of distance traveled. If you are using the metric system your spring constant would be in Newtons per millimeter of distance traveled. Extension springs have the same units of measurements as compression springs, however torsion spring constant is calculated in force per 360 degrees of travel.



 



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For instructions on how to use our Free Online Spring Calculator visit our page:

Compression Spring Calculator Instructions

Extension Spring Calculator Instructions

Compression Spring Constant

 When determining a spring constant there are 2 different formulas you can use depending which information you have available to you. The first formula is the one most commonly used when you know the dimensions on your spring but do not know your load and distance traveled on the spring.



Explanation of Symbols:
d = wire size (inches)
D = Mean Diameter (inches)
N = Number of active coils 
D / d = Index correction

G = Shear Modulus of Material

k = Spring Constant


G-Value for Common Spring Materials

Music Wire = 11.5 x 10^6

Stainless Steel = 11.2 x 10^6

Phospher Bronze = 5.9 x 10^6

Monel = 9.6 x 10^6

Inconel = 11.5 x 10^6

Copper = 6.5 x 10^6

Beryllium Copper = 6.9 x 10^6

Example of Calculating the Compression Spring Constant

d = 0.035 inches
OD = 0.500 inches
D = 0.465 inches
N = 8
Wire Type = Music Wire
G = 11.5 x 10^6 psi
FL = 1.000 inches

 

k = Gd^4 / 8D^3N


k = (11.5 x 10^6) (0.035)^4) / 8 (0.465)^3 (8)


k = 17.2571875 / 6.434856


k = 2.68 lbs / inch


The other way to calculate the compression spring constant on your spring is if you know the load you want to achieve at a certain distance traveled.  The formula to figure out your spring constant from a known load and distance traveled is


Rate = Load / Distance Traveled


For Example:

Load = 10 pounds

Travel = 4 inches

Rate = 10 lbs / 4 inches

Rate = 2.5 pounds / inch

Extension Spring Constant


Calculating your extension spring constant uses the same formula as the compression spring constant calculation.  Make sure when measure your extension spring you have the correct measurement for each value.  For more information on this please visit our spring measurement and specifications page


Explanation of Symbols:
d = wire size (inches)
D = Mean Diameter (inches)
N = Number of active coils 
D / d = Index correction

G = Shear Modulus of Material

k = Spring Constant


G-Value for Common Spring Materials

Music Wire = 11.5 x 10^6

Stainless Steel = 11.2 x 10^6

Phospher Bronze = 5.9 x 10^6

Monel = 9.6 x 10^6

Inconel = 11.5 x 10^6

Copper = 6.5 x 10^6

Beryllium Copper = 6.9 x 10^6


Example of Calculating the Extension Spring Constant

d = 0.044 inches
OD = 0.425 inches
D = 0.381 inches
N = 5
Wire Type = Music Wire
G = 11.5 x 10^6 psi
FL = 1.250 inches

 

k = Gd^4 / 8D^3N


k = (11.5 x 10^6) (0.044)^4) / 8 (0.381)^3 (5)


k = 43.103104 / 2.21225364


k = 19.472 lbs / inch


The other way to calculate the extension spring constant on your spring is if you know the load you want to achieve at a certain distance traveled.  The formula to figure out your spring constant from a known load and distance traveled is


Rate = Load / Distance Traveled


For Example:

Load = 2 pounds

Travel = 0.25 inches

Rate = 2 lbs / 0.25 inches

Rate = 8 pounds / inch

Torsion Spring Constant:

Calculating torsion spring constant is a little different than calculating the spring constant for compression or extension springs.  Since a torsion spring travels in degrees and not linearly it needs a different formula. Below you can see the formula for torsion spring constant and an example of how the formula works.



Explanation of Symbols:
d = wire size (inches)
D = Mean Diameter (inches)
N = Number of active coils
R = Rate per 360 degrees
S = Stress (lbs / square in)
P = Load (lbs)
M = Moment (inch-lbs)
D / d = Index correction

Modulus of Elasticity "E" for common spring wires.
PSI x 10^6
Music Wire = 30 psi
Stainless Steel = 28 psi
Chrome Vanadium = 30 psi
Chrome Silicon = 30 psi
Phosphor Bronze = 15 psi


Torsion Spring Rate Calculation Example:

Formula:

Rate Per 360 degrees = Ed^4 / 10.8 DN


Spring Parameters

d = 0.035 inches

OD = 0.500 inches

D = 0.465 inches

N = 3 coils

Wire Type = Music Wire

E For Music Wire = 30 x 10^6




Example:


Rate Per 360 Degrees = (30 x 10^6) (0.035^4) / 10.8 (0.465)(3)

Rate Per 360 Degrees = 45.01875 / 15.066

Rate Per 360 Degrees = 2.988 pounds / 360 degrees


To determine your rate per degree divide the above answer by 360


Rate Per Degree = Rate Per 360 Degrees / 360

Rate Per Degree = 2.988 / 360

Rate Per Degree = 0.0083 pounds / degree

Acxess Spring, 455 W. La Cadena Dr. Suite 12, Riverside, CA 92501

PH: (951) 276-2777, FX: (951) 240-3334 EMail: sales@acxesspring.com